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Sex trafficking in Rapid City

kids,” or chronic runaways. Some may be non-citizens, without legal status. Some are vulnerable because of emotional or mental instability. Severe poverty can make many targets for trafficking. (Resource: sdcedsv.org)

PIERRE – Attorney General Marty Jackley, United States Attorney Ron Parsons, Pennington County States Attorney Mark Vargo, Rapid City Police Chief Karl Jegeris, and Pennington County Sheriff Kevin Thom announce that the Division of Criminal Investigation, the South Dakota Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Force, and Homeland Security Investigations have conducted investigations into sex trafficking in Rapid City.

“Law enforcement has joined together in a cooperative operation that focuses on removing sexual predators from our streets. Our operations continue to protect children and send a message that South Dakota is off-limits to anyone seeking to harm our children,” said Jackley.

The investigation resulted in the following felony arrests for sex crimes:

Robert Bungert, 55, Sturgis, Attempted Enticement of a Minor Using the Internet (18 USC 2422(b))

Zam Mung, 29, Rapid City, Attempted Enticement of a Minor Using the Internet (18 USC 2422(b))

Jeremiah Stertz, 30, Yankton, Attempted Enticement of a Minor Using the Internet (18 USC 2422(b))

Paul Heib, 50, Rapid City, Attempted Enticement of a Minor Using the Internet (18 USC 2422(b))

Connor Harmon, 20, Sturgis, Attempted Enticement of a Minor Using the Internet (18 USC 2422(b))

Adam Myosky, 38, Port Clinton, Ohio, Attempted Enticement of a Minor Using the Internet (18 USC 2422(b))

All these individuals are presumed innocent until such time as proven guilty. 1302 E. Hwy 14, Suite 1 • Pierre, SD 57501 • 605-773-3215 http::////attg..sd..gov//

The Attorney General’s Offi ce would like to extend its appreciation to the Rapid City Police Department, Pennington County Sheriff’s Office, Sturgis Police Department and Homeland Security Investigations for their efforts and continued cooperation.

WHAT IS SEX TRAFFICKING?

Sex trafficking is a part of human trafficking. Under federal and state law human trafficking includes recruiting, harboring, transportation, provision or obtaining of a person for through the use of force, fraud of coercion for the purpose of involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bond, or slavery. Trafficking occurs in labor exploitation – often in restaurant work, sweatshop factory work or migrant agricultural work. It is referred to as a modern-day form of slavery.

Sex trafficked victims may be forced through fraud, threats, beatings, physical and psychological torture, or addictions to engage in prostitution, pornography and exotic dancing.

Who Are Sex Traffickers?

There is no one face of traffickers. They include a wide range of criminals. Sex trafficker’s common names are pimps, madams, or now Bob and/or are referred to as boyfriends or husbands. Sometimes they are relatives of the victim, or pose as their employer. Traffickers may be small or large business owners, be part of a loose-knit decentralized criminal network or international organized criminal syndicate. The majority of “johns” are male.

Who Are the Victims of Sex Traffickers?

Victims of sex trafficking are vulnerable, isolated, “invisible” to most of society. The majority is young and female. The majority of victims of sex trafficking have already experienced sexual and other forms of violence. Many are “throw away kids,” or chronic runaways. Some may be non-citizens, without legal status. Some are vulnerable because of emotional or mental instability. Severe poverty can make many targets for trafficking. (Resource: sdcedsv.org)

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